President Donald Trump (R) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in deliver a joint statement from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2017.

Carlos Barria | Reuters

President Donald Trump (R) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in deliver a joint statement from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2017.

Kim’s latest maneuver may just be another form of pressure on Washington, she continued — a theory shared by political scientists.

In fact, she said she believes the U.S. is a bigger concern than Kim. If Trump “pressures the North, I am worried whether that will corner North Korea. Many of former leaders have taken a gentle approach with the North before so I’m concerned whether this will provoke Pyongyang.”

Another woman by the name of Choi Yoon-jung believed current tensions would eventually subside.

“I think this is part of our routine in South Korea,” she said, adding that in her view, Trump and Kim “will stop this at some point, people lose interest when these leaders are talking about scenarios that go out of common sense.”

One South Korean man, Ahn Min-wook, believed in Seoul and Washington’s capability to diffuse the situation.

“This time around, North Korea’s rhetoric is stronger than usual…But I wouldn’t say I’m worried too much because I feel like the leaders of South Korea and the U.S. are getting along very well.”

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