Air Force general officers salute the President of the U.S. as he departs April 20, 2016, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

U.S. Air Force photo | Staff Sgt. Armando A. Schwier-Morales

Air Force general officers salute the President of the U.S. as he departs April 20, 2016, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

The world’s most famous aircraft, an 800,000-pound flying fortress that extends the power of the White House into the skies, just got a step closer to the assembly line.

On Tuesday, the Trump administration confirmed a handshake deal with Boeing for the next Air Force One and its twin decoy for $3.9 billion.

The current U.S. Air Force planes (VC-25A), which are highly modified Boeing 747-200 series aircraft, have served the presidency since 1990 as “airborne Oval Offices” and are quickly reaching the end of their lifespan.

“The Boeing 747-200 ceased production in 1987 and is no longer operated in the U.S. commercial passenger-carrying industry. The Air Force is the only remaining domestic operator,” according to a U.S. Air Force statement.

What’s more, the replacement parts for the current Air Force One jets are diminishing and therefore becoming an “ever-increasing problem that will continue to worsen.”

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