A Tsunami warning push alert sent to phones across the East Coast on Tuesday morning was just a test, according to the National Weather Service.

Meteorologist Hendricus Lulofs told the Associated Press there was a glitch during a routine test around 8:30 a.m., and the weather service is trying to figure out what happened.

Users on some mobile apps, including Accuweather’s, received what looked like an actual warning on their lock screens.

Accu Alert

An alert sent to people about a tsunami warning early Tuesday that the National Weather Service says was just a test.

 (Mykel MacCarthy/Fox News)

The forecast service tried to allay any fears, tweeting: “The National Weather Service Tsunami Warning this morning was a TEST. No Tsunami warning is in effect for the East Coast of the U.S.”

National Weather Service offices in the region are also using social media to emphasize there’s no tsunami warning.

“A monthly Tsunami Warning test was issued around 830 am by @NWS_NTWC. We have been notified that some users received this test message as an actual Tsunami Warning.  A Tsunami Warning is not in effect. Repeat, a Tsunami Warning is not in effect,” the National Weather Service office in Caribou, Maine said.

The glitch came hours before the House Homeland Security Committee holds a a hearing on the nation’s emergency alert systems after a false ballistic missile alert was sent out in Hawaii in mid-January.

HAWAII MAN WHO SENT FALSE MISSILE ALERT WAS ‘100 PERCENT SURE’ ATTACK WAS REAL

The former state employee – a man in his 50s who asked to remain anonymous in a recent interview for his safety – said that he was “100 percent sure” that the drill on Jan. 13 was real, even though several other employees heard the word “exercise” repeated throughout the message, according to officials.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

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